Skip to Content

The author

Richard Terry

Group Account Director

Working in digital marketing, you can almost become blasé about new technologies and styles of campaigns. That’s exactly why the recent tv campaign by Save The Children, which utilises Shazam, is so exciting.

Working in digital marketing, you can almost become blasé about new technologies and styles of campaigns.

That’s exactly why the recent tv campaign by Save The Children, which utilises Shazam, is so exciting.

Charity campaigns have long used emotive music to pull at the heart strings of the audience and more recently they’ve been making it easier than ever to donate via mobile. People have also been tagging with Shazam for some time too.

So the components of what I’m going to share are not new, but  it’s the approach that is.

While the advert was showing, a call to action scrolled across the top of the screen asking the audience to “Shazam to help now”. Intrigued by this as a subtle call to action, I did. This took me through to the below screen:

As you can see, this not only gave the option donate – but it also gave me opportunities to learn about the work that they are carrying out across the world. This was all within the Shazam interface and led me to the Save The Children (mobile optimised) site.

This is one of the most interesting and engaging integrated multi-platform campaigns I’ve seen in some time.

The key to its success for me is the simplicity – in terms of being a customer and an advertiser.

Taking one of the earliest adopted apps obviously increased its reach (to the 300 million current users!) and by giving the audience a new (and very easy) way to donate which also empowered them is really smart, too.

When Shazam was initially launched, it was almost a faddish party trick that the first iPhone users flashed about. Seeing the technology being integrated into advertising is a genuinely innovative way of keeping the app front of mind for potential users and, dependent on its uptake, a great way for the owners to make some vastly improved revenue streams (one assumes TV advertising is more lucrative that app sales!).

Researching this further, I recently saw this is very much the case, as reported on the Guardian who spoke with Shazam’s executive vice president of marketing David Jones at Mobile World Congress.

He informed them that while the majority of its users are tagging music, TV shows and films, apps represent the biggest growth area for them. This is backed up by the fact that they are now creating content for not just adverts, but for every single programme on 160 American TV channels available when users tag the show. This can take the form quizzes, unique clips, cast bios etc.

This is allowing entertainment to create further engagement.

In the case of advertising, brands will pay Shazam to make their TV adverts interactive, as detailed in the Save The Children example, and this is where the opportunity lies for them at a “cost between $75k and $200k” per slot for a campaign that will run for several months.

Shazam is looking like a rather profitable and sustainable ‘fad’ now.

I for one will be following how this can become as profitable for advertisers as a marketing channel as it will be for Shazam.