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The author

Matt Buckley

PPC Manager

Those people that have Adwords linked to Analytics Google might have noticed a new addition to the ‘Customise columns’ tab. These three Analytics metrics are a welcome feature that many people have been calling out for in recent years: <ul> <li>Bounce rate</li> <li>Pages / visit</li> <li>Avg. Visit Duration (seconds)</li> </ul>

Those people that have Adwords linked to Analytics Google might have noticed a new addition to the ‘Customise columns’ tab. These three Analytics metrics are a welcome feature that many people have been calling out for in recent years:

  • Bounce rate
  • Pages / visit
  • Avg. Visit Duration (seconds)
All three metrics give a gauge of how much a visitor interacts with your website and by simply using a combination of the three, you can estimate how engaged a group of visitors are. For example, a low bounce rate and a lot of pages per visit is generally a good sign. The addition of this extra set of data is brilliant for advertisers, but how and when can you use it? No Conversion Tracking There are times where conversion tracking isn’t enabled or is broken in some way and there isn’t anything you can do about it. As frustrating as it is, there is often very little you can do, but by using these three metrics, you can continue to run Adwords and focus on delivering customers that stick around. Promoting Brand Awareness The aim of some campaigns is just to drive clicks and promote brand awareness. Since each visitor costs money, you want to drive the most engaged customers. These kind of campaigns often become static after a while. By optimising to these three metrics, you can show your client how you are continuing to drive real, measurable improvements. Landing Page Optimisation Thinking of split testing landing pages? Well, by bringing these three metrics into the calculation, you can perform another level of analysis that helps you pick the right page as the winner. If your conversion rate is too close to call a winner, this might help you come to a better conclusion. Pitfalls of using Bounce rate Bounce rate isn’t the be all and end all; you also have to account for the type of product being advertised and the landing page used. Product listing adverts often have a fairly high bounce rate as the user lands on a specific product and will immediately know if it’s what they want or not. However, if you land traffic on a category page, visitors are encouraged to filter down into the desired area and  so you will have less bounces. As an example of this; product listings adverts often convert quite well but also have a high bounce rate – so remember to take this into account! What are your thoughts on the newly added metrics feature?