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The Motor Trade: Ahead of the game with mobile experiences. Do insurers need to follow suit?.

The author

Steve Baker

Chief Analyst

As with many of my blogs, this following story is based on a recent real-life experience of mine. I'm currently looking for a new second-hand car for my ever-expanding family. While I've got the obvious app on my phone (AutoTrader), I have also been massively impressed by the user experience of other motor trade outlets on the mobile platform.

As with many of my blogs, this following story is based on a recent real-life experience of mine. I'm currently looking for a new second-hand car for my ever-expanding family. While I've got the obvious app on my phone (AutoTrader), I have also been massively impressed by the user experience of other motor trade outlets on the mobile platform.

Both Carcraft and The Car People provide excellent mobile experiences; both host mobile-specific sites, with a simple interface that effectively takes the user through their search facility which returns results quickly and mirrors the search filters on their main sites. This experience has led me to visit these outlets to look at the cars that matched my search. I haven't purchased anything at present but I've visited places that I wouldn't usually have done, if I'm honest. When at these outlets, the detailed listings for cars were very good. One fact was missing, though: insurance costs. As all car retailers do, they stated the insurance grouping. But who can honestly say they know what these groupings equate to? I've been driving for 12 years now, and I have no idea what these signify. So while I was looking at cars I might purchase, I wanted to get an insurance quote. Even an indicative quote would be fine, yet none of the major insurance houses could provide me with a quick, fast and intuitive experience, causing me to ditch my potential purchase and head home for the safer broadband connection and laptop. Not only are the insurance companies missing out here, but the car retailers are too. A mobile app or site that gives the user a quick quote - even with a ten per cent margin for error - would aid these purchases and potentially improve insurance policy uptake. The "quick quote" functions offered by a lot of the insurance comparison sites were also slow and ask for too much detail, taking ten to 12 minutes to complete and return a quote. This could lead to a strategic link up of sorts between car retailers and insurance giants, though it would certainly improve the overall user shopping experience by providing a better way for potential customers to get the quotes they need.