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Facebook is in trouble in Germany, specifically with the Hamburg Data Protection Authority, which has re-opened its investigation against Facebook’s facial recognition feature, demanding the deletion of any biometric data held by Facebook.  The service was suspended in the EU in July.

Facebook is in trouble in Germany, specifically with the Hamburg Data Protection Authority, which has re-opened its investigation against Facebook’s facial recognition feature, demanding the deletion of any biometric data held by Facebook.  The service was suspended in the EU in July. You can see how such a feature would be useful for end users who need to upload every picture they take from every evening out and tag it, however, I’m not sure how realistic the birthday dinner bit is…

 “Every day, people add more than 100 million tags to photos on Facebook. They do it because it's an easy way to share photos and memories. Unlike photos that get forgotten in a camera or an unshared album, tagged photos help you and your friends relive everything from that life-altering skydiving trip to a birthday dinner where the laughter never stopped. Tags make photos one of the most popular features on Facebook.”
However, under EU law, you have to give your explicit consent to have any of your biometric details stored in a database - Facebook is just relying on people disabling the privacy option. Just look at how happy these people are now that they are having their biometric data stored, you could literally be this happy too, if it wasn’t for those pesky privacy guys. We will have to wait until the second audit is completed and until next month for it to present the conclusions. In the near future, you may be able to trade your face and location for discounts too, check this idea out from Red Pepper which is still in concept phase.
 “Our custom-developed cameras then simply use this existing data to identify you in the real world. Personalized deals can now be delivered to your smartphone from all participating locations—all you have to do is show your face.”
I’m not overly keen on this, but whatever your views, facial recognition looks to be here to stay. The UK government is already using facial recognition at ePassport terminals  after putting out a £12.8 million tender for the software earlier in the year. “The camera will now match your face to the photograph held in the chip in your passport. Once it has found a match, the gate will open and you can exit.” If all this is making you feel a little paranoid, Anonymous have released a video on how to evade facial recognition software in cameras, probably best not to actually try this in an airport… And finally, if you are thinking of scanning your own face, head over to Yahoo Answers for some excellent advice… *Runs away screaming*