Skip to Content

The author

James Holding

Head of Analytics

I recently came across some interesting research by Google that shows the incremental click increase generated from paid search advertising. Overall the study suggests that a click uplift of 89% is generated by paid search advertising, which is much higher than I expected. Of course, this study does not account for every circumstance, and openly points out those situations where paid and organic ads sit in close proximity; the uplift to clicks is minimal.

I recently came across some interesting research by Google that shows the incremental click increase generated from paid search advertising. Overall the study suggests that a click uplift of 89% is generated by paid search advertising, which is much higher than I expected. Of course, this study does not account for every circumstance, and openly points out those situations where paid and organic ads sit in close proximity; the uplift to clicks is minimal.

For those people interested in the details of the study, it can be found here. Alternatively check out the following short video that will likely remind you of being in school (just me?): It would be interesting if the study expanded to include a brand/non-brand split, as I wonder if they provide different levels of uplift (and even how they interact with each other). Previously I have seen results for newly created brands (and accounts) with no offline marketing (or even organic presence), which show an increase/decrease in brand activity that matches the paid search spend increase/decrease (although with a slight delay due to the buying cycle). Similarly, consider a brand who dominates the organic listings and also run a PPC Brand campaign. I have seen this scenario combined with unusual competitor activity, causing the brand campaign to run out of budget early for several days. Over this period, sales saw a notable drop in the evening (the same time the brand campaign ran out of budget). If the PPC campaign was only cannibalising organic clicks, surely no drop in sales should have occurred. Admittedly, this scenario is a one off with unique circumstances and I am not suggesting this will always be the case, but it is nice to read more reliable studies on similar situations. Now it would be nice to have a study by someone who does not make billions of dollars from PPC advertising, would it not? Any thoughts? - @JamesMHolding