Skip to Content

“Google or Facebook, Google or Facebook....” Twitter, Feb 2011.

The author

Epiphany Search

This week has seen the re-emergence of allegations that media giants Google and Facebook are two of a handful of companies interested in buying social media platform Twitter. As a channel, Twitter has boomed in the last two years, seeing phenomenal sign-up rates from industry leaders and tech-savvy consumers alike. In terms of its corporate appeal, businesses have taken advantage of the b2c nature of the search engine, allowing brands to reach out to their communities and have real conversations with them in real time.

This week has seen the re-emergence of allegations that media giants Google and Facebook are two of a handful of companies interested in buying social media platform Twitter. As a channel, Twitter has boomed in the last two years, seeing phenomenal sign-up rates from industry leaders and tech-savvy consumers alike. In terms of its corporate appeal, businesses have taken advantage of the b2c nature of the search engine, allowing brands to reach out to their communities and have real conversations with them in real time.

Graham Mudd, VP of comScore, explained last year that Twitter had seen some of the fastest and largest growth in his research experience – talking of nearly three out of four global internet users' access social networking sites [mainly Twitter] each month. In terms of our product offering as a search agency, we value Twitter as an integral part of our social media service, which is an increasingly vital element of any search campaign. So the importance speaks for itself! Twitter has increased its product offering in the last year in a bid to compete with the bigger social media players, introducing features like promoted tweets, upgrading their interface and they’re rumoured to be introducing their own analytics package. Twitter has been estimated in between the values of $8b and $10 billion. It hasn’t been selling ads for 12 months yet by December 2010 had made more than $200m, and was valued at $3.7 billion. The inflation seems extravagant but in comparison, Facebook is valued at a whopping $50 billion. Other developments, such as AOL shelling out $315 million for the Huffington Post may have raised the stakes. Why not sell you might ask?! Well, executives at Twitter have been thought to want to continue to build and grow a successful, independent company. We’ll certainly be watching this space....