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Should You Put The Content Network Into A Separate Campaign?.

The author

Steve Baker

Chief Analyst

The answer to this question should be yes. After all, that way you can easily monitor it's performance as a whole (rather than produce a separate report for it, or having to flick through your adgroups all the time). Also, you may find that different advert text works more effectively on the content network - creating a new campaign allows you to write an advert for the content network, and one for the search network. So that should be that then. But it's not quite that straightforward. I recently took over the management of a campaign that was running on both the search and content networks. Thinking that this would be a good opportunity to assess the size of potential benefits from splitting the networks into separate campaigns, I did so. The result was disastrous! They had been receiving 80% of their traffic through the content network, and most of it disappeared! Slightly disappointed, I switched everything back. But the traffic didn't return. So what went wrong? Well, it appears that Google's content network uses different variables in its Quality Score, or at least puts very different emphasis on the different factors. Specifically, it appears to use the age of the campaign (or, to be more precise, the length of time that it's been on the content network). So, the longer your campaign is running on the content network, the greater its exposure appears to be on the content network. And if you turn off the content network, when you turn it back on, you're back to square one. This doesn't strike me as particularly sensible, though I can see why Google might be doing it. If a campaign isn't working on the content network, then it gets switched off quite quickly. So the fact that it's been running for a while is a good indicator that it's what people are interested in. Remember that the clickthrough rate is virtually useless on the content network, as it highly sensitive to things like the location of the adverts on the page. So what's the correct move, then? I'd say that if you've got a successful, established campaign on the content network, then LEAVE IT ALONE!!! If you've just started out on the content network, or you are considering it, then you can certainly give it a campaign and budget of its own. My campaign has now recovered to about 45% of its former traffic. Don't make the same mistake that I did.

The answer to this question should be yes. After all, that way you can easily monitor it's performance as a whole (rather than produce a separate report for it, or having to flick through your adgroups all the time). Also, you may find that different advert text works more effectively on the content network - creating a new campaign allows you to write an advert for the content network, and one for the search network. So that should be that then. But it's not quite that straightforward. I recently took over the management of a campaign that was running on both the search and content networks. Thinking that this would be a good opportunity to assess the size of potential benefits from splitting the networks into separate campaigns, I did so. The result was disastrous! They had been receiving 80% of their traffic through the content network, and most of it disappeared! Slightly disappointed, I switched everything back. But the traffic didn't return. So what went wrong? Well, it appears that Google's content network uses different variables in its Quality Score, or at least puts very different emphasis on the different factors. Specifically, it appears to use the age of the campaign (or, to be more precise, the length of time that it's been on the content network). So, the longer your campaign is running on the content network, the greater its exposure appears to be on the content network. And if you turn off the content network, when you turn it back on, you're back to square one. This doesn't strike me as particularly sensible, though I can see why Google might be doing it. If a campaign isn't working on the content network, then it gets switched off quite quickly. So the fact that it's been running for a while is a good indicator that it's what people are interested in. Remember that the clickthrough rate is virtually useless on the content network, as it highly sensitive to things like the location of the adverts on the page. So what's the correct move, then? I'd say that if you've got a successful, established campaign on the content network, then LEAVE IT ALONE!!! If you've just started out on the content network, or you are considering it, then you can certainly give it a campaign and budget of its own. My campaign has now recovered to about 45% of its former traffic. Don't make the same mistake that I did.